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Showing posts with label Society. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Society. Show all posts

Jul 24, 2019

Being Canadian (2015)



When Calgarian Robert Cohen moved to L.A. to pursue his dreams of becoming a comedy writer, he quickly realized that his new friends and colleagues knew nothing but the usual stereotypes about his beloved homeland. After years of frustration, Robert decided to embark on a personal quest, traveling from one end of Canada to the other, to prove being Canadian is more than just maple syrup and Mounties. Imagine "Sherman's March" or "Roger and Me", but wearing a toque.

Can We Take a Joke? (2015)



In the age of social media, nearly every day brings a new eruption of outrage. While people have always found something to be offended by, their ability to organize a groundswell of opposition to--and public censure of--their offender has never been more powerful. Today we're all one clumsy joke away from public ruin. Can We Take A Joke? offers a thought-provoking and wry exploration of outrage culture through the lens of stand-up comedy, with notables like Gilbert Gottfried, Penn Jillette, Lisa Lampanelli, and Adam Carolla detailing its stifling impact on comedy and the exchange of ideas. What will the future be like if we can't learn how to take a joke?

Jul 23, 2019

Requiem for the American Dream (2015)



In a series of interviews spanning four years, leftist social critic Noam Chomsky discusses how the concentration of wealth and power among a small elite has polarized American society and brought about the decline of the middle class.

The Other Side (2015)



In an invisible territory at the margins of society lives a wounded community who face the threat of being forgotten by political institutions and having their rights as citizens trampled. Disarmed veterans, taciturn adolescents, drug addicts trying to escape addiction through love; ex-special forces soldiers still at war with the world; floundering young women and future mothers; and old people who have not lost their desire to live. Through this hidden pocket of humanity, renowned documentarian Roberto Minervini opens a window to the abyss of today's America.

Model Citizens (2016)



Somewhere in the world right now--much closer than you think--people are playing with trains. You might not see them at first, but they're there. In basements. In garages. In converted Army barracks. They're among the world's most compelling underground communities. To the outside world, model railroading may seem a strange obsession. But who cares about the outside world when you can make your own world? Just ask a model railroader. Some say they're playing with trains. Others say they're staying engaged and staying alive. Either way, there's more to model railroading than meets the eye. Too many people grow up and grow out of what they loved as kids. Model railroaders are different. They're doing exactly what they want to do--and they don't need to explain themselves. But in Model Citizens, several do. Their stories and motivations may surprise you. You may even learn a thing or two. To all the free spirits out there . . . and the rest left grasping at freedom: The message is simple. Be yourself. Do your thing.

Jul 22, 2019

Class Divide (2015)



This documentary explores the gentrification of New York City via a single intersection in Chelsea, where children from both low-income public housing and an expensive private school interact. Directed by Marc Levin.

Jul 19, 2019

Generation Startup (2016)



GENERATION STARTUP takes us to the front lines of entrepreneurship in America, capturing the struggles and triumphs of six recent college graduates who put everything on the line to build startups in Detroit. Shot over 17 months, it's an honest, in-the-trenches look at what it takes to launch a startup. Directed by Academy Award winner Cynthia Wade and award-winning filmmaker Cheryl Miller Houser, the film celebrates risk-taking, urban revitalization, and diversity while delivering a vital call-to-action-with entrepreneurship at a record low, the country's economic future is at stake.

Bachelor Girls (2016)



In the heart of city of dreams, Mumbai, the leading urban metropolis of India, single independent women are facing housing discrimination because of their status of being 'unmarried'. 'Bachelor Girls' as labeled by the society, struggle to find homes amidst many biases, and question the idea of freedom for women in today's modern India.

The Rachel Divide (2018)



Self-described "trans racial" activist Rachel Dolezal ignited an unprecedented media storm when a local news station in Spokane, WA outed her as a white woman who had been living as the black president of the NAACP. Since the controversy erupted, director Laura Brownson and team exclusively filmed with Rachel, her sons and her adopted sister Esther, capturing the intimate, vérité life story of a damaged character who lands squarely in the cross-hairs of race and identity politics in America - and exploring how that character still provokes negative reactions from millions who see her as the ultimate example of white privilege. A Netflix original documentary, The Rachel Divide, is executive produced by Academy Award winner Roger Ross Williams.

Recovery Boys (2018)



In the heart of America's opioid epidemic, four men attempt to reinvent their lives and mend broken relationships after years of drug abuse. Recovery Boys, from Academy Award nominated director Elaine McMillion Sheldon (Heroin(e)), is an intimate look at the strength, brotherhood, and courage that it takes to overcome addiction and lays bare the internal conflict of recovery. In an effort to break the cycle of generational addiction and trauma, the young men let go of painful pasts as they live in the present, and build a new community in a farming-based rehab. After rehab, they experience life's trials and tribulations sober, but struggle to find their place and purpose in an often unforgiving society. In today's world, where shocking statistics about the opioid crisis make headlines daily, Recovery Boys gives a deeply personal look into the unseen lives of those working toward transformation.

To the Moon and Back (2016)



The shocking chronicle of the Russian Adoption Ban and the American father targeted by Vladimir Putin; A story of scandal, murder and innocent orphans held hostage in a political chess game.

Jul 13, 2019

State of Exception (2017)



As Rio de Janeiro took to the world stage with preparations for the 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics, a community of self-described "urban Indians" organized to fight back against their forced evictions, joining forces with other marginalized groups. Spending six years following their plight, Jason O'Hara embedded himself within these communities, steadfastly committed to highlighting the injustices that abound.

Day Is Done (2011)



A smokestack stubbornly pierces the sky. Trains rumble by down below. Lights come on in the buildings as night falls. There is a man behind the camera, looking for an image -- of himself? Of the world? Of society? By day and night, in rain and snow, he stands filming at the window of his studio. Periodically we hear people leaving messages on his answering machine. They talk about the weather while on vacation and congratulate him on his birthday. His father dies, a child is born, the young family begins to fall apart. Time passes. Slowly the cityscape morphs into the inner landscape of the man behind the camera.

Jul 1, 2019

Everyday Rebellion (2013)



A documentary about modern and creative forms of non-violent protest and civil disobedience.

Jun 28, 2019

Out of Many, One (2018)



The United States has long offered a promise of opportunity and safety to arriving immigrants - The American Dream. However, currently facing a time of deep political, social, and cultural divide, immigration has become a divisive issue.

Jun 27, 2019

Maineland (2017)



Filmed over three years in China and the U.S., "Maineland" is a multi-layered coming-of-age tale that follows two teenagers of China's wealthy elite as they settle into a boarding school in blue-collar rural Maine. Part of the enormous wave of "parachute students" enrolling in U.S. private schools, bubbly, fun-loving Stella and introspective Harry come seeking a Western-style education, escape from the dreaded Chinese college entrance exam, and the promise of a Hollywood-style U.S. high school experience. But as their fuzzy visions of the American dream slowly gain more clarity, worlds collide as their relationship to home and country takes on a surprisingly poignant new aspect.

Factory Complex (2015)



The drastic economic development in South Korea once surprised the rest of the world. However, behind of it was an oppression the marginalized female laborers had to endure. The film invites us to the lives of the working class women engaged in the textile industry of the 1960s, all the way through the stories of flight attendants, cashiers, and non-regular workers of today. As we encounter the vista of female factory workers in Cambodia that poignantly resembles the labor history of Korea, the form of labor changes its appearance but the essence of the bread-and-butter question remains still.

Jun 26, 2019

The Long Shadow (2017)



When filmmaker and investigative journalist Frances Causey, a daughter of the South, set out to explore the continuing racial divisions in the US, what she discovered was that the politics of slavery didn't end with the Civil War. In an astonishingly candid look at the United States' original sin, The Long Shadow traces slavery's history from America's founding up through its insidious ties to racism today.

Jun 25, 2019

Samsara (2011)



Prepare yourself for an unparalleled sensory experience. Samsara reunites director Ron Fricke and producer Mark Magidson, whose award-winning films Baraka and Chronos were acclaimed for combining visual and musical artistry. Samsara is a Sanskrit word that means "the ever turning wheel of life" and is the point of departure for the filmmakers as they search for the elusive current of interconnection that runs through our lives. Filmed over a period of almost five years and in twenty-five countries, Samsara transports us to sacred grounds, disaster zones, industrial sites, and natural wonders. By dispensing with dialogue and descriptive text, Samsara subverts our expectations of a traditional documentary, instead encouraging our own inner interpretations inspired by images and music that infuses the ancient with the modern.

Jun 23, 2019

Hale County This Morning, This Evening (2018)



In Hale County This Morning, This Evening, Ross offers an inspired and intimate portrait of a place and its people. The film presents Daniel Collins and Quincy Bryant, two young African American men from rural Hale County, Alabama, over the course of five years. Collins attends college in search of opportunity while Bryant becomes a father to an energetic son in an open-ended, poetic form that privileges the patiently observed interstices of their lives. The audience is invited to experience the mundane and monumental, birth and death, the quotidian and the sublime, all of which combine to communicate the region's deep culture and glimpse the complex ways the African American community's collective image is integrated into America's visual imagination.


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