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Showing posts with label Science. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Science. Show all posts

Is Genesis History? (2017)


Is Genesis History? is a 2017 American Christian film that uses creation science, a pseudoscientific concept, to promote Young Earth creationist beliefs that contradict established scientific facts regarding the origin of the Universe, the age of the Earth, and the common descent of all lifeforms.

Particle Fever (2013)


Imagine being able to watch as Edison turned on the first light bulb, or as Franklin received his first jolt of electricity. For the first time, a film gives audiences a front row seat to a significant and inspiring scientific breakthrough as it happens. Particle Fever follows six brilliant scientists during the launch of the Large Hadron Collider, marking the start-up of the biggest and most expensive experiment in the history of the planet, pushing the edge of human innovation. As they seek to unravel the mysteries of the universe, 10,000 scientists from over 100 countries joined forces in pursuit of a single goal: to recreate conditions that existed just moments after the Big Bang and find the Higgs boson, potentially explaining the origin of all matter. But our heroes confront an even bigger challenge: have we reached our limit in understanding why we exist? Directed by Mark Levinson, a physicist turned filmmaker, from the inspiration and initiative of producer David Kaplan and masterfully edited by Walter Murch (Apocalypse Now, The English Patient), Particle Fever is a celebration of discovery, revealing the very human stories behind this epic machine.

The Most Unknown (2018)



The Most Unknown is an epic documentary film that sends nine scientists to extraordinary parts of the world to uncover unexpected answers to some of humanity's biggest questions. How did life begin? What is time? What is consciousness? How much do we really know? By introducing researchers from diverse backgrounds for the first time, then dropping them into new, immersive field work they previously hadn't tackled, the film reveals the true potential of interdisciplinary collaboration, pushing the boundaries of how science storytelling is approached. What emerges is a deeply human trip to the foundations of discovery and a powerful reminder that the unanswered questions are the most crucial ones to pose. Directed by Emmy-nominated and Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Ian Cheney (The Search for General Tso, The City Dark) and advised by world-renowned filmmaker Werner Herzog (Fitzcarraldo, Aguirre, The Wrath of God, Grizzly Man), The Most Unknown is an ambitious look at a side of science never before shown on screen. The film was made possible by a grant from Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science.

Journey to the Edge of the Universe (2008)



Take an express journey to the edge of the universe as the filmmakers at National Geographic use computer-generated animation to build on images captures by the Hubble Telescope. Beginning on planet Earth, viewers are hurtled into the deepest reaches of space. There are no stops on this flight, and along the way the mysteries of the universe come alive as filmmakers examine the history and science of distant celestial bodies.

In the Womb: Multiples (2007)


Advanced technology, groundbreaking scientific discoveries about the beginnings of life, and computer animation all combine to detail how multiple siblings develop in the womb as the filmmakers at National Geographic explore the fetal growth of twins, triplets, and quadruplets. Detailed pictures of these different groupings in various stages of fetal development bring the earliest stages of life to the screen as never before.

In addition to shining a light on the amazing process of development a fetus goes through, it also lets one into the mysterious world of what it's like to actually be in there, and to be on the same amazing journey with one, two, or even three other companions.

One can't help but wonder how much these newborn multiples remember of their time in the womb, when they formed a bond like no other...

Richard Feynman: The Pleasure of Finding Things Out (1981)


Richard Feynman was a scientific genius with - in his words - a "limited intelligence". This dichotomy is just one of the characteristics that made him a fascinating subject. The Pleasure of Finding Things Out exposes us to many more of these intriguing attributes by featuring an extensive conversation with the acclaimed Nobel Prize winner.

During the course of the interview, which was conducted in 1981, Feynman uses the undeniable power of the personal to convey otherwise challenging scientific theories. His colorful and lucid stories make abstract concepts tangible, and his warm presence is sure to inspire interest and awe from even the most reluctant student of science. His insights are profound, but his delivery is anything but dry and ostentatious.

Heralded as one of the greatest physicists of all time, his curiosity was nurtured by his military father, who encouraged him to explore and comprehend the world around him in a manner that transcended textbooks and grade school teachings. Armed with a restless thirst for knowledge, he felt constrained as a young boy by an educational system that favored memorization techniques over true learning. His observations of early boyhood experiences - when he questioned everything from the composition of a flower to the nature of inertia - clue us in on the birth and evolution of a great mind.

The film isn't all about childhood wonder and the innocence of discovery, however. After having established himself as an undeniable talent in the world of physics, his expertise was called upon to assist in the development of the atom bomb during World War II. His essential involvement in the Manhattan Project, and the catastrophic loss of life it eventually wrought, left him severely tormented. His self-doubt soon rectified itself in the form of historic research and theory development, influential teaching assignments, and from achieving the top prize in his field - the Nobel Prize in physics.

Filmed just seven short years prior to his untimely death, The Pleasure of Finding Things Out is a highly engrossing tribute to a towering intellect, and a valuable reminder of how the complex beauty and potential consequences of science impact us all.

In the Womb (2005)


From the moment of conception, every human embryo embarks on an incredible nine month journey of development. Now, cutting-edge technology makes it possible for National Geographic's In the Womb to open a window into the hidden world of the fetus and explore each trimester in amazing new detail. Revolutionary imagery sheds light on the delicate, dark world of a fetus as never before.

This movie is actually a combination of 4-dimensional real-time sonograms and re-created "animation" of a fetus developing. I don't mean cartoon animation, but just a re-creation of a baby in an actual womb. With both, the fetus is actually moving around and shown exactly as it develops, moves, etc. I would say there is about 5 whole minutes of 4D sonogram footage and the rest is re-creation footage (which is very detailed and much more appealing to watch).

We are currently studying biology and life science so this movie was very appropriate and fit in well with our biology books and materials. A new tidbit that I had yet to read or hear was that sperm could smell the egg, which helps them to find it. We giggled over that part, which was entirely new to us. There is only about 5 minutes devoted to actual childbirth and only one quick view of the baby's head and shoulders being born.

Nova: Origins: How Life Began (2004)


Has the universe always existed? How did it become a place that could harbor life? NOVA presents some startling new answers in Origins, a new 4-part series. New clues from the frontiers of science are presented by astrophysicist Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson. As the host of Origins, Tyson leads viewers on a journey to the beginning of time and to the depths of space, in search of the first stirrings of life and its traces on other worlds.

The documentary is very scientific considering as many options/possibilities as possible. Everything is well done. Just when you think they will skip an idea or just touch one it, they do a good job elaborating on it. The topics covered include: How the Earth formed?, How common is an earth-like planet?, search for extra-solar planets, the chemistry of life, formation of life molecules, big bang theory, cosmic microwave background and much more. If you like documentaries about origins of life and space, then this is likely one that you will enjoy.

I would strongly urge all members of Planet Earth to take a few entertaining and informative hours to understand what we know today about the origin of the Earth. Even if you are not in agreement, it gives you an idea on what popular consensus in the scientific community today.

The Elegant Universe (2003)


Adapted from a provocative book by Brian Greene, this deeply engrossing documentary -- which originally aired on PBS's NOVA in three parts -- attempts to explain the controversial string theory, a complicated scientific proposal that, in short, posits a single explanation for many of the universe's mysteries. As affable an egghead as you're likely to find, Greene engages an array of physicists in his examination of string theory, which in part blends Einstein's theory of relativity with the complex laws governing quantum mechanics. Although mind-numbing technical terms are kept to a minimum, those of us not conversant with advanced physics might feel a bit lost at times.

Still, the subject is undeniably fascinating, and some of the conclusions are nothing short of mind-blowing: a reasoned, professional discussion of a universe encompassing 11 separate dimensions certainly calls Johnny Carson's "I did not know that" to mind.

In some ways reminiscent of Carl Sagan's Cosmos series, The Elegant Universe is even tougher to get a handle on. But the effort will prove rewarding, especially when you're looking for a way to melt the ice at cocktail parties.


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