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Showing posts with label Politics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Politics. Show all posts

Jun 25, 2019

We Blew It (2017)



How did America move from Easy Rider to Donald Trump? What became of the dreams and utopias of the 1960s and 1970s? What do those who have lived through this golden age think today? Did they really screw everything up in the air? Filmed in Cinemascope, from New Jersey to California, this melancholic and elegiac road-movie portrays a disconcerted, complex America, heated to blank by a year of electoral campaign. Inconsolable of a golden age become her last romantic frontier, she is nevertheless preparing to pull the trigger Trump.

May 2, 2019

Endgame: Blueprint for Global Enslavement (2007)


The conspiracy-themed release Endgame: Blueprint for Global Enslavement attempts to make a case for the idea that the governments of the contemporary world are uniting to form a new world order and enslave all of humanity, murdering 80% of the global population.

Subtopics include the formation of the Bilderberg Group, the evolution of the North American Transportation Control Grid and the collapse of the USA.

Obsession: Radical Islam's War Against the West (2007)


In the wake of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Islamic fundamentalism has, in the minds of many, taken the place once held by communism as the leading threat to the safety and security of the industrialized West. Filmmakers Wayne Kopping and Raphael Shore explore what they regard as the most dangerous force since the rise of Nazism in this documentary.

Obsession: Radical Islam's War Against the West features footage from Arab television outlets with interviews which are compared with newsreel images of terrorist actions staged by the PLO and other groups in an effort to show parallels between hate-based groups of the past and the current mood among Islamic extremists. Obsession also includes interviews with guerilla fighters, former Hitler Youth members, and terrorist operatives as they discuss the role and function of extremist political and religious groups.

Obsession is a film about the threat of Radical Islam to Western civilization. Using unique footage from Arab television, it reveals an 'insider's view' of the hatred the Radicals are teaching, their incitement of global jihad, and their goal of world domination. The film also traces the parallels between the Nazi movement of World War II, the Radicals of today, and the Western world's response to both threats. Featuring interviews with Daniel Pipes, Steve Emerson, Alan Dershowitz, a former PLO terrorist, and a former Hitler Youth Commander.

Apr 23, 2019

Terrorstorm: A History of Government Sponsored Terrorism (2006)


A filmmaker who is well known for his criticism of the methodology which drives some governments to respond to terrorist attacks by ramping up their combative rhetoric and sending soldiers into battle, Alex Jones takes a closer look at such tragedies as the bombings in London and Madrid to explore how these issues may be better solved by choosing to fight back with peace instead of bombs.

Throughout history, criminal elements inside governments have carried out terror attacks against their own populations as a pretext to enslave them.

TerrorStorm reveals how, in the last hundred years, Western leaders have repeatedly murdered their own citizens while posing as their saviors.

Apr 18, 2019

The U.S. vs. John Lennon (2006)


In retrospect, it seems absurd that the United States government felt so threatened by the presence of John Lennon that they tried to have him deported.

But that's what happened, as chronicled in directors David Leaf and John Scheinfeld's The U.S. vs. John Lennon.

The film starts slowly, with a familiar look at the former Beatle's troubled childhood, his outspokenness as one of the Fabs ("We're more popular now than Jesus Christ," etc.), and his eventual hook up with Yoko Ono, paralleled by the growth of political protest in '60s America, particularly against the Vietnam War.

Apr 15, 2019

Spin (1995)


Artist Brian Springer spent a year scouring the airwaves with a satellite dish grabbing back channel news feeds not intended for public consumption.

The result of his research is SPIN, one of the most insightful films ever made about the mechanics of how television is used as a tool of social control to distort and limit the American public's perception of reality.

Take the time to watch it from beginning to end and you'll never look at TV reporting the same again. Tell your friends about it. This extraordinary film released in the early 1990s is almost completely unknown. Hopefully, the Internet will change that.

Apr 14, 2019

Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch's War on Journalism (2004)


Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch's War on Journalism uses the inflammatory tactics of the Fox News Channel to demonstrate the conservative bias that's handed down by Fox's owner, media mogul Rupert Murdoch. The documentary gathers interviews from media watchdogs and former Fox employees (including a former anchor, Jon Du Pre, who describes his flailing efforts to create a celebration for Reagan's birthday when the one he was sent to cover never materialized), but their overwhelming condemnation of Fox's skewed news practices isn't half as effective as footage taken directly from Fox itself--an appalling montage of pundit Bill O'Reilly telling guests to shut up.

While the Fox News cable network has promoted itself as a "fair and balanced" news outlet -- so much so that they've even trademarked the phrase -- not everyone believes that they're living up to their slogan, and this activist documentary by filmmaker Robert Greenwald takes a close look at the political perspective of Fox's coverage. Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch's War on Journalism examines the right-wing slant of Fox News' reporting, as represented in stories the network chooses to cover and their shoehorning of editorial opinion into stories, revealed in interviews with former Fox employees and several noted journalists (including Walter Cronkite) who discuss the pro-conservative, anti-Democratic views of the channel's management and how they're manifested in their programming. The film also puts talk show host Bill O'Reilly under the microscope and offers potent examples of his frequently abrasive interviewing style. Production of Outfoxed was supported in part by the leftist political action network Moveon.org.

The Panama Deception (1992)


Years before the US went after Saddam Hussein, the White House had Manuel Noriega, another former ally, in its sights.

In their Oscar-winning documentary, director Barbara Trent and writer/editor David Kasper (Cover Up: Behind the Iran Contra Affair) contrast media coverage of the 1989 invasion with expert testimony.

The filmmakers backtrack to America's turn-of-the-century takeover of the Panama Canal--and volatile aftermath--before flashing forward to the reform-minded Carter era. When the CIA-supported Noriega comes to power, reform gives way to repression, and Reagan calls for the dictator's ouster.

His successor, Bush, brings in the troops. It would be one thing if they only targeted military facilities, but witnesses claim soldiers also fired on civilians and residential property (a Pentagon spokesman denies the accusation).

Depending on the source, casualties ranged from 250 to 4,000. Narrated by Elizabeth Montgomery, Panama Deception was shot on video--and looks it--but content is king.

The War Room (1993)


A look inside the 1992 presidential race, D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hedgus' documentary The War Room explores the backstage side of national politics by examining the day-to-day operations of Bill Clinton's campaign staff. The behind-the-scenes leader of the group is James Carville, the demonstrative, charismatic campaign manager who relies on a plain-speaking manner and emotional appeals to motivate his subordinates. He is complemented by the quieter, smoother personality and photogenic looks of young press spokesman George Stephanopoulous. The filmmakers follow these two contrasting personalities from the January New Hampshire primary to Clinton's eventual victory, as they attempt to cling to an overall strategic plan while dealing with unforeseen problems and negative press, as their candidate is saddled with accusations of adultery and draft-dodging. Subplots include the rivalries between Democratic campaign staffs -- which can become amusingly petty, as when they accuse each other of tearing down campaign posters -- and the romantic relationship between Carville and Mary Matalin, chief strategist for George Bush's campaign. Co-director D.A. Pennebaker (Monterey Pop, Don't Look Back, Primary) is renowned as an innovator in the use of cinema-verite, used here to show both the mundane complications and the emotional highlights of the modern political process.

The Men Who Killed Kennedy (1988)


This artfully constructed series offers chilling evidence that American democracy has become a convenient lie; that a conspiratorial coup d'├ętat removed a sitting president and then hid that fact from the American people.

This sounds like the stuff of wild-eyed paranoia, but these filmmakers did their homework well--interviews include levelheaded witnesses, suspicious government agents, and Dallas cops present in Dealey Plaza on November 22, 1963.

Some of the "proof" (especially in Episode 2, "The Forces of Darkness") seems a bit far-fetched, but the sheer number of unexplained facts is riveting.

An autopsy attendant describes a procedure botched by meddling Secret Service agents. A deaf-mute eyewitness shares his recollection of uniformed men hiding a rifle and leaving the site of the assassination unchallenged.

The playlist contains all 9 episodes filmed from 1998 to 2003: The Coup D'Etat" (1988), The Forces Of Darkness (1988), The Cover-Up (1991), The Patsy (1991), The Witnesses (1991), The Truth Shall Make You Free (1995), The Smoking Guns (2003), The Love Affair (2003), The Guilty Men (2003).


Anarchism in America (1983)


A colorful and provocative survey of anarchism in America, the film attempts to dispel popular misconceptions and trace the historical development of the movement.

The film explores the movement both as a native American philosophy stemming from 19th century American traditions of individualism, and as a foreign ideology brought to America by immigrants.

The film features rare archival footage and interviews with significant personalities in anarchist history including Murray Boochkin and Karl Hess, and also live performance footage of the Dead Kennedys.


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