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Showing posts with label Food. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Food. Show all posts

The Kids Menu (2016)



THE KIDS MENU is a feature documentary from the team that brought you "Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead." As filmmaker Joe Cross spent time traveling the world with his previous two films, he met thousands of people and one issue that came up again and again was what to do about the growing childhood obesity problem. In THE KIDS MENU, Joe meets with experts, parents, teachers and kids, coming to the realization that childhood obesity isn't the real issue, but rather a symptom of a bigger problem. The lack of knowledge of what healthy foods are. Lack of access to healthy and affordable options. And the influence of negative role models, whether a parent, teacher or even a celebrity. All of this together seems to be a lot to overcome, but when empowered, kids often make the surprising choice of the healthier path. In this inspiring and hopeful documentary, we see amazing programs in action, inspiring individuals paving the way for change, but most of all - Kids, taking the lead in getting healthier options on their own menu.

Fed Up (2014)



For the past 30 years, everything we thought we knew about food and exercise is dead wrong. FED UP is the film the food industry doesn't want you to see. From Katie Couric, Laurie David (Oscar winning producer of AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH) and director Stephanie Soechtig, FED UP will change the way you eat forever. The film opens in theaters across the country on May 9th.

Straight Up: Kentucky Bourbon (2018)



Kentucky's rise to undisputed Bourbon Capital of the world is a rich, detailed, and innovative story that displays how the state has continued to play an integral role in raising the level of global whiskey making to unprecedented heights. From sour mash and charred barrels to the name Bourbon itself, Kentucky-based producers lead the world in both production and innovation. As the stills continue to pump out whiskey and the barrels are filled and stored, the people that make up Kentucky's bourbon empire tell of their state's rise to bourbon dominance.

Our Daily Bread (2005)



In the tradition of such acclaimed cinéma direct works as Jean Eustache's Le Cochon (1970) and Frederick Wiseman's Meat (1976) comes Nikolaus Geyrhalter's 92-minute documentary Our Daily Bread -- an ironic, detached cinematic glimpse of how the food we eat on a daily basis is picked, killed, mechanically processed, and packaged for human consumption. Geyrhalter resists having an overtly political or muckraking agenda; instead, his sequence of images acts as an extended visual meditation, a plunge into the poetic mundanity of everyday existence. By singling out processes that we would otherwise take for granted or overlook, Geyrhalter calls our attention to the more absurd and surreal aspects of the food chain -- with the graceful and rhythmic, yet thoroughly strange and haunting, processes of automatization in the foreground.


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